To the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania October 11, 1779

To the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania October 11, 1779

PHILADELPHIA,

HONORABLE SIRS:

Some few days ago I presented a letter to this honorable Board stating the inconveniences which I lay under from an attention to public interest in preference to my own, to which I have received no reply. It is to me a matter of great concern to find in the government of this State, that which appears to be a disposition in them to neglect their friends and to throw discouragements in the way of genius and letters.

At the particular request of the gentleman who presides at this Board, I took up the defence of the Constitution, at a time when he declared to me that unless he could be assisted he must give it up and quit the State; as matters then pressed too heavy upon him, and the opposition was gaining ground; yet this Board has since suffered me to combat with all the inconveniences incurred by that service, without any attention to my interest or my situation. For the sake of not dishonoring a cause, good in itself, I have hitherto been silent on these matters, but I cannot help expressing to this Board the concern I feel on this occasion, and the ill effect which such discouraging examples will have on those who might otherwise be disposed to act as I have done.

Having said this much, which is but a little part of which I am sensible, I have a request to make which if complied with will enable me to overcome the difficulties alluded to and to withdraw from a service in which I have experienced nothing but misfortune and neglect. I have an opportunity of importing a quantity of printing paper from France, and intend collecting my several pieces, beginning with Common Sense, into two volumes, and publishing them by subscription, with notes; but as I cannot think of beginning the subscription until the paper arrive, and as the undertaking exclusive of the paper, will be attended with more expense than I, who have saved money both in the service of the continent and the State, can bear, I should be glad to be assisted with the loan of fifteen hundred pounds for which I will give bond payable within a year. If this should not be complied with, I request that the services I have rendered may be taken into consideration and such compensation made me therefore as they shall appear to deserve.

I am, honorable sirs, your obedient and humble servant,

THOMAS PAINE.