To Honorable Robert Morris November 26, 1781

To Honorable Robert Morris November 26, 1781

MONDAY MORNG,

SIR:

I am much obliged to you for the Abbe Raynal's History. I have made some extracts from it, which has occasioned me to keep it longer than I intended. There are several mistakes in it, and his opinions are often contradiction to one another. His account of the rejection of the offers of the British Ministry pages 133, 134, 135, is erroneous. I send you my remarks thereon, which you will please return to me when you have perused them. His idea of the Alliance is injurious, because it is not so much what motives brought them together as what consequences will ensue from it that is the object of philosophical enquiry. And all other considerations apart, the Alliance has a tendency to free the mind of prejudice. I can feel it in myself, but his account of the confederated powers (page 162) is truly cynical-pages 149 and 155 touches on a political secret.

I am sorry to see Mr. Deane's letters get into our papers, as I am very apprehensive they were written for the purpose of publication, and not with a design of being sent to the persons they are directed to. I have mentioned this to Bailey the printer and advised him to discontinue them, and the more so, as the remarks he makes on them is not equal to the poison they infuse.

I return you my thanks for your kindness to Temple Harris, the bearer of this. He is an honest, diligent, obliging youth, and I am persuaded will answer Mr. Whiteside's expectation.

Col. Eveleigh lent me some English newspapers of yours. I returned them yesterday except two which I have sent to the Printers. The [Colonel] desired me to mention this to you as you will find them two short of the proper number; the other two will be returned on Thursday.

I am, Sir, Your Obedient Humble Servant,

THOMAS PAINE.

P. S. Contrary to my expectations the attack on Augustine by the Spaniards is spoke of by the S[outh] C[arolina] Gentlemen as an agreeable circumstance to them.